Deposit Multiplier

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Deposit Multiplier'

A function that describes the amount of money created in a bank's money supply. This money is created by lending money that is in excess of its required reserve to borrowers.

Calculated as:

Deposit Multiplier

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deposit Multiplier'

The Federal Reserve and other central banks require that banks must hold a minimum amount (required reserve) of money in their reserves in order to fulfill withdrawal requests from depositors. Banks are then allowed to lend out any excess to borrowers (such as for mortgages), while the liability incurred as a result of depositors is still on the books.

For example, suppose that the required reserve ratio is 25%. This means that the deposit multiple is four. For banks, this means that for every $4 that is deposited, a total of $1 must be kept in reserves.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Non-Member Banks

    A bank that is not a member of the U.S. Federal Reserve System. ...
  2. Reserve Requirements

    Requirements regarding the amount of funds that banks must hold ...
  3. Money Supply

    The entire stock of currency and other liquid instruments in ...
  4. Multiplier Effect

    The expansion of a country's money supply that results from banks ...
  5. Undisclosed Reserves

    The unpublished or hidden reserves of a financial institution ...
  6. Monetary Policy

    The actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  2. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  3. Forex Education

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  4. Economics

    What's The Impact On Equities If The Rates Hike?

    The Fed is on course for raising interest rates. True, that leaves the question of when (most likely June or September, but could be later) and how much.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Why Didn't Quantitative Easing Lead To Hyperinflation?

    Hyperinflation is an exponential rise in prices and tends to occur not when countries print too much money, but is instead associated with a collapse in the real underlying economy.
  6. Investing

    What Has Been Groupon’s Growth Strategy?

    Groupon established a strategy with efforts to become a broader force in the e-commerce world and to expand more strongly into international markets.
  7. Investing

    Are You Ready To Invest In The Tech Sector?

    Tech stocks, particularly those of mature tech companies, are well positioned and offer meaningful upside potential in the near-term.
  8. Investing

    Strategies To Position Your Bond Portfolio

    Fixed income investors may not be able to see them all right now, but important trends are stirring on the investment horizon.
  9. Economics

    The Impact Of Ending The US Embargo On Cuba

    Many argue that ending the US embargo on Cuba will not only make US consumers happy, but also help the US economy and bring more freedoms to Cuba.
  10. Economics

    How Unconventional Monetary Policy Works

    Unconventional monetary policy, such as quantitative easing, can be used to jump-start economic growth and spur demand.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the amount of goods or services produced. Fixed costs are expenses ...
  2. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  3. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  4. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  5. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  6. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
Trading Center