Depository

What is a 'Depository'

A depository, on the simplest level, is used to refer to any place where something is deposited for storage or security purposes. More specifically, it can refer to a company, bank or an institution that holds and facilitates the exchange of securities. Or a depository can refer to a depository institution that is allowed to accept monetary deposits from customers.

BREAKING DOWN 'Depository'

Central security depositories allow brokers and other financial companies to deposit securities where book entry and other services can be performed, like clearance, settlement and securities borrowing and lending.

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