Deprivatization

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DEFINITION of 'Deprivatization'

The act of transferring ownership from the private sector to the public sector. Deprivatization often occurs when a government attempts to maintain the stability of its critical infrastructure during periods of economic distress. This can occur in various segments of the economy.

Also known as "nationalization".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deprivatization'

Deprivatization generally occurs in the areas of transportation, electricity generation, natural gas, water supply and healthcare because governments want to ensure these sectors are functioning properly so that the country can continue to run smoothly. In addition, electrical, natural gas and hydro companies tend to be monopolies, and governments will often want to have control in these areas to ensure that consumers have access to these essential services at a reasonable cost.

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