Deregulation

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DEFINITION of 'Deregulation'

The reduction or elimination of government power in a particular industry, usually enacted to create more competition within the industry.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deregulation'

Traditional areas that have been deregulated are the telephone and airline industries. In the late 1990s and early 2000s the utility industry (power companies) in North America started to deregulate.

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