Deutsche Aktien Xchange 30 - DAX 30

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DEFINITION of 'Deutsche Aktien Xchange 30 - DAX 30'

Germany's benchmark stock market index, it is a total return index of the 30 largest German blue-chip companies traded on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. The Deutsche Aktien Xchange 30 (DAX 30) had a base value of 1,000 as of December 31, 1987. It was previously known as the Deutscher Aktien Index 30.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deutsche Aktien Xchange 30 - DAX 30'

Companies included in the DAX index have historically included household names such as Adidas, BMW, Deutsche Bank, Siemens and Volkswagen. By virtue of being a proxy for the performance of the German stock market, the DAX index is one of the most important equity indexes in Europe and worldwide.

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