Digital C-Type Print

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DEFINITION of 'Digital C-Type Print'

A chromogenic color print created by a digital exposure system. A digital C-type print is developed by exposing light-sensitive material to either LEDs or lasers, with the material then washed using techniques similar to traditional photography.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Digital C-Type Print'

Digital C-type prints differ from ink jet prints because ink jet prints use fine droplets of ink rather than light sources, such as a laser. The machines used for digital C-type prints can be significantly more expensive than ink jet printers, and tend to be used primarily in commercial settings. The longevity of digital C-type prints is also estimated to be shorter than pigment-based printing, and the number of materials than can be printed on are more limited.

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