Dual Income, No Kids - DINKS

What does 'Dual Income, No Kids - DINKS' mean

Dual income, no kids (DINKS) is a household in which there are two incomes and no children (either both partners are working or one has two incomes). DINKS are often the target of marketing efforts for luxury items such as expensive cars and vacations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dual Income, No Kids - DINKS'

Couples living in a DINK household are thought to have more disposable income because they don't have the added expenses that come with children. Contrast this with "DEWKS".

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