Direct Purchase Program


DEFINITION of 'Direct Purchase Program'

A direct purchase program is a method by which individuals can buy stock in a company directly from that company. The advantage of a direct purchase program is that there is no need to pay any broker fees or commissions. The majority of big corporations offer direct purchase programs as a way of encouraging investment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Purchase Program'

Direct purchase programs differ from company to company. These programs are required to comply with complex federal and state securities laws, which can impose various restrictions and eligibility requirements for investors wishing to acquire stock in this manner. This rise of low-cost brokerage services has caused this method of commission-free purchasing to decline in popularity.

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