Direct Repurchase

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Direct Repurchase'

The buying of shares in a publicly-traded company by the company itself. A direct repurchase reduces the number of shares outstanding, thereby inflating (positive) earnings per share and, often, the value of the stock. The stock purchased by the company can then be retired or kept as treasury stock, which can be re-issued at a later date.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Direct Repurchase'

Direct repurchases are often seen in a very positive light, as such transactions are generally done by companies looking to increase the equity value of their shares. However, just because a company announces the intent to repurchase outstanding shares, does not mean that it will definitely happen.
Until 2004, companies did not have to disclose whether they repurchased company stock or not. The SEC now requires that companies divulge their share repurchases for the past quarter in their 10-Q and 10-K filings.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Treasury Stock (Treasury Shares)

    The portion of shares that a company keeps in their own treasury. ...
  2. Outstanding Shares

    A company's stock currently held by all its shareholders, including ...
  3. Accelerated Share Repurchase - ...

    A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding ...
  4. Dividend Reinvestment Plan - DRIP

    A plan offered by a corporation that allows investors to reinvest ...
  5. Takeunder

    An offer to purchase or acquire a public company at a price per ...
  6. Share Repurchase

    A program by which a company buys back its own shares from the ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the requirements for being a Public Limited Company?

    The requirements for an entity to be considered a public limited company (PLC) include registration requirements, establishing ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I place an order to buy or sell shares?

    It is easy to get started buying and selling stocks, especially with the advancements in online trading since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Using The Price-To-Book Ratio To Evaluate Companies

    The P/B ratio can be an easy way to determine a company's value, but it isn't magic!
  2. Investing

    A Breakdown Of Stock Buybacks

    Find out what these company programs achieve and what it means for stockholders.
  3. Brokers

    Tips For When To Buy, Sell Or Hold

    Knowing how to make sound snap decisions is a must for any broker.
  4. Investing

    Acorns: The Perfect Investing Tool For Millennials

    We look at how the Acorns app works, how it makes money, and why is it innovative.
  5. Options & Futures

    How to Make Money by Trading Index Options

    Index options are less volatile and more liquid than regular options. Understand how to trade index options with this simple introduction.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Do Stock Splits Cause Volatility?

    Since stock splits decrease the stock price, do they also increase volatility because shares are traded in smaller increments? Investopedia examines assumptions about this increasingly common ...
  7. Investing

    4 Structured Product Types Wealthy Clients Love

    High-net-worth investors find structured products appealing for a variety of reasons. Here's a look at four types.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard MSCI EAFE

    Learn more about Vanguard's index-shifting, low-cost and non-U.S. market exchange-traded fund: the FTSE Developed ex U.S. Markets ETF.
  9. Investing

    Some Overseas Markets May Prove More Resilient

    Though global markets sold off and have continued to slip in recent days, stocks in Europe and Japan are still faring better than their U.S. counterparts.
  10. Investing

    The Number One Reason Why Most Traders Fail

    We show you the simple tools, availble to everyone, to succeed as an active trader: education, experience, charts, vision, and risk management systems.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  2. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  3. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  4. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  5. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  6. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!