Direct Rollover


DEFINITION of 'Direct Rollover'

A distribution of eligible rollover assets from a qualified plan, 403(b) plan, or a governmental 457 plan to a Traditional IRA, qualified plan, 403(b) plan, or a governmental 457 plan; or a distribution from an IRA to a qualified plan, 403(b) plan or a governmental 457 plan.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Rollover'

Direct rollover assets are made payable to the qualified plan or IRA Custodian/Trustee, never to the individual.

A direct rollover is reportable but not taxable.

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  1. What are the Roth 401(k) withdrawal rules?

    To make a "qualified" withdrawal from a Roth 401(k) account, the account holder must have been contributing to the account ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. I want to close my IRA account. What percentage will I lose to tax?

    You can move the amount by means of a trustee-to-trustee transfer to another IRA, or roll over the amount to your 401(k). ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can I roll my 403(b) and 457 into other low-cost venders when I change jobs?

    It is very likely than you will be able to roll over or transfer these amounts after you stop working for your current employer. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When can catch-up contributions start?

    Most qualified retirement plans such as 401(k), 403(b) and SIMPLE 401(k) plans, as well as individual retirement accounts ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who can make catch-up contributions?

    Most common retirement plans such as 401(k) and 403(b) plans, as well as individual retirement accounts (IRAs) allow you ... Read Full Answer >>
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