Disability Insurance Trust Fund


DEFINITION of 'Disability Insurance Trust Fund'

An account within the Social Security Trust Fund used to pay benefits to individuals deemed to be disabled and incapable of productive work. The Disability Insurance Trust Fund receives deposits from FICA considered to be over and above the amount needed for day-to-day operations of disability insurance under social security. These funds are held in trust and any funds not required for current expenses are invested in interest-bearing federal securities.

BREAKING DOWN 'Disability Insurance Trust Fund'

The Disability Insurance Trust Fund was created in 1956 as a part of the Social Security Act Amendments of 1956. The fund's board of trustees consists of six members, two of which are appointed by the President, and the remaining four are automatically selected due to their positions in the federal government; These four positions are: Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Commissioner of Social Security.

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