Discount Yield

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DEFINITION of 'Discount Yield'

Discount yield is a measure of a bond's percentage return. Discount yield is most frequently used to calculate the yield on short-term bonds and treasury bills sold at a discount. This yield calculation uses a 30-day month and 360-day year to simplify calculations. Discount yield is calculated by the following formula:
Discount Yield = [(par value - purchase price)/par value] * [360/days to maturity]

BREAKING DOWN 'Discount Yield'

The 30/360 simplification used in discount yield means that the discount yield figure is a slightly inaccurate measure of an investor's true return on investment. Although more accurate measures of yield are available, discount yield is still used as a matter of convention within the short-term bond and treasury bill world. This may be partially due to the fact that the yield on U.S. Treasury Bills is most commonly quoted as a discount yield.

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