Discounting

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DEFINITION of 'Discounting'

The process of determining the present value of a payment or a stream of payments that is to be received in the future. Given the time value of money, a dollar is worth more today than it would be worth tomorrow given its capacity to earn interest. Discounting is the method used to figure out how much these future payments are worth today.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Discounting'

Discounting is one of the core principals of finance and is the primary factor used in pricing a stream of cash flows, such as those found in a traditional bond or annuity. For example, the succession of coupon payments found in a regular bond is discounted by a certain interest rate and summed together with the discounted par value to determine the bond's current value.

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