Discretionary Cash Flow


DEFINITION of 'Discretionary Cash Flow'

Discretionary cash flow is any money left over once all possible capital projects with positive net present values have been financed, and all mandatory payments have been paid. The capital can be used to pay for other responsibilities such as giving out cash dividends to stockholders, buying back common stock and paying off any outstanding debt.

BREAKING DOWN 'Discretionary Cash Flow'

How discretionary cash flow is distributed is the responsibility of management. They decide how to use the funds to benefit the company the most. The way these funds are allocated can have huge affects on the performance of the company, and as a result the evaluation of the effectiveness of management.

  1. Cash Flow

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  2. Net Present Value - NPV

    Net Present Value (NPV) is the difference between the present ...
  3. Disposable Income

    The amount of money that households have available for spending ...
  4. Discretionary Income

    The amount of an individual's income that is left for spending, ...
  5. Discounted Cash Flow (DCF)

    Discounted cash flow (DCF) is a valuation method used to estimate ...
  6. Internal Rate Of Return - IRR

    A metric used in capital budgeting measuring the profitability ...
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  1. What are the disadvantages of using net present value as an investment criterion?

    While net present value (NPV) calculations are useful when you are valuing investment opportunities, the process is by no ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Which is a better measure for capital budgeting, IRR or NPV?

    In capital budgeting, there are a number of different approaches that can be used to evaluate any given project, and each ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can companies use the cash flow statement to mislead investors?

    Cash flow is a means for most investors to examine the actual economics of a business they might invest in, especially from ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I use discounted cash flow (DCF) to value stock?

    Discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis can be a very helpful tool for analysts and investors in equity valuation. It provides ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the formula for calculating weighted average cost of capital (WACC) in Excel?

    When analyzing different financing options, companies need to look at how much it will cost to fund operations. There are ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>

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