Disequilibrium

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DEFINITION of 'Disequilibrium'

A situation where internal and/or external forces prevent market equilibrium from being reached or cause the market to fall out of balance. This can be a short-term byproduct of a change in variable factors or a result of long-term structural imbalances.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Disequilibrium'

This theory was originally put forth by economist John Maynard Keynes. Many modern economists have likened using the term "general disequilibrium" to describe the state of the markets as we most often find them. Keynes noted that markets will most often be in some form of disequilibrium - there are so many variable factors that affect financial markets today that true equilibrium is more of an idea; it is helpful for creating working models, but lacks real-world validation.

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