Disinvestment

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DEFINITION of 'Disinvestment'

1. The action of an organization or government selling or liquidating an asset or subsidiary. Also known as "divestiture".

2. A reduction in capital expenditure, or the decision of a company not to replenish depleted capital goods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Disinvestment'

1. A company or government organization will divest an asset or subsidiary as a strategic move for the company, planning to put the proceeds from the divestiture to better use that garners a higher return on investment.

2. A company will likely not replace capital goods or continue to invest in certain assets unless it feels it is receiving a return that justifies the investment. If there is a better place to invest, they may deplete certain capital goods and invest in other more profitable assets.

Alternatively a company may have to divest unwillingly if it needs cash to sustain operations.

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