Display Book

DEFINITION of 'Display Book'

A detailed tracking tool used on market exchanges that displays, records and executes market order data based on order type, price, time and quantity for a specific security. Specialists on an exchange will have their own display books for each security they trade.

BREAKING DOWN 'Display Book'

The most famous display book is the NYSE Display Book, which is used by the specialists on the exchange to execute orders and manage order flow. It is useful for keeping track of the market activity in a specific security. In addition, data is posted continuously to the consolidated tape. In the past, the display book was simply a notebook kept by each specialist; however, due the advent of computer technology, the display book is now kept in electronic format.

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