Diversified Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Diversified Fund'

An investment fund that contains a wide array of securities to reduce the amount of risk in the fund. Actively maintaining diversification prevents events that affect one sector from affecting an entire portfolio, make large losses less likely.

BREAKING DOWN 'Diversified Fund'

A diversified fund contrasts with specialized or focused funds, such as sector funds, which focus on stocks in specific sectors such as biotechnology, pharmaceuticals or utilities, or in particular regions such as Asia or Europe.

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RELATED FAQS
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