DEFINITION of 'Divestment'

The process of selling an asset. Also known as divestiture, it is made for either financial or social goals. Divestment is the opposite of investment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Divestment'

Generally you'd just say that you are selling an asset. The term divestment is more appropriate however in the following contexts:

1) A change in corporate strategy - a firm might say that they are divesting a particular subsidiary to focus on their core business.

2) Social goals - there are many political reasons why investors might reduce investments. A notable example was the withdrawal of American firms from South Africa during apartheid.

  1. Discontinued Operations

    A segment of a company's business that has been sold, disposed ...
  2. Social Responsibility

    The idea that companies should embrace its social responsibilities ...
  3. Socially Responsible Investment ...

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because ...
  4. Protest Divestment

    The intentional selling of stock or other assets on a large scale ...
  5. Investment

    An asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will ...
  6. Asset

    1. A resource with economic value that an individual, corporation ...
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