Dividend Tax Credit

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Dividend Tax Credit'

The amount a Canadian resident applies against their tax owing on the grossed up portion of dividends received from Canadian corporations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dividend Tax Credit'

The dividends an individual receives from Canadian corporations are "grossed up" by 25%. This amount is then included on their income tax form as taxable income. Both Canadian federal and provincial governments then grants individuals a tax credit, equal to a percentage of the grossed up amount. This helps to reduce the actual tax payable.

Let's run through an example. Susan Smith has a marginal income tax rate of 25% and is located in Alberta, where the provincial dividend tax credit is 6.4%. The federal dividend tax credit is 13.33%. Her total dividends for the year were $250. On the taxable income portion of her tax return she will include $312.50 (250*1.25). Her approximate taxes owing on this dividend would then be $78.13 (312.50*25%). She also receives dividend tax credits of $41.67 (312.50*13.33%) and $20 (312.50*6.4%). Therefore, in all her taxes payable on her dividend is $16.46 (78.13-41.67-20). This amounts to only 6.58% of her original dividend.

Dividend tax credits are implemented in an attempt to offset double taxing, since dividends are paid to shareholders with a corporation's after-tax profit and the dividends received by shareholders are also taxed.

There are both federal and provincial tax credits.

VIDEO

Loading the player...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Dividend

    A distribution of a portion of a company's earnings, decided ...
  2. Advance Corporation Tax - ACT

    The prepayment of corporate taxes by companies in the United ...
  3. Double Taxing

    A tax law that causes the same earnings to be subjected to taxation ...
  4. Tax Credit

    An amount of money that a taxpayer is able to subtract from the ...
  5. Gross Income

    1. An individual's total personal income before taking taxes ...
  6. Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS)

    A UK program that helps smaller, riskier companies to raise capital ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Can I get a tax credit from conducting research and development?

    It is possible for a company to qualify for a research and development tax credit for conducting research and development. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How can the price of a stock change on the ex-dividend date?

    An investor looking for a dividend-paying stock has two important dates to consider when investing in a company. The first ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is the ex-dividend date for a dividend on a stock determined?

    The ex-dividend date is actually determined by the appropriate stock exchange, not by the company paying the dividend. The ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the importance of calculating tax equivalent bond yield?

    Fixed-income investors measure portfolio returns using yields. Since most bonds do not produce high returns like equity markets, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the drawbacks of a small investor buying blue-chip stocks?

    Blue-chip stocks are generally safer for investors. However, their drawbacks for small investors include moderate growth ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the average annual dividend yield of companies in the automotive sector?

    As of May 2015, using trailing 12-month data, the annual dividend yields of industries in the automotive sector are 1.01% ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    How And Why Do Companies Pay Dividends?

    If a company decides to pay dividends, it will choose one of three approaches: residual, stability or hybrid policies. Which a company chooses can determine how profitable its dividend payments ...
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Dividends Matter

    Seven words that are music to investors' ears? "The dividend check is in the mail."
  3. Taxes

    Give Your Taxes Some Credit

    A few tax credits can greatly increase the amount of money you get back on your return.
  4. Investing

    Prospering In The Next Bear Market: Here's How

    Prepare to survive, and even prosper, in the impending bear market, by considering and putting into action the following four strategies.
  5. Professionals

    How to Best Navigate Taxes in Retirement

    Here's a rundown on tax strategies that can help extend the life of a nest egg.
  6. Stock Analysis

    Why Hasn't McDonald's Beaten The Dow Recently?

    McDonald's has underperformed the Dow Industrials since 2009, but a reorganization and buyback could turn things around.
  7. Investing Basics

    How Does a Dividend Reinvestment Plan Work?

    A dividend reinvestment plan allows investors to use their dividends to purchase more shares of the corporation’s stock, rather than receiving payment.
  8. Savings

    5 Things to Look for in a Private Banker

    When putting all your assets into one private banker basket, it pays to proceed with caution.
  9. Taxes

    10 Little Known Ways To Reduce Your 401(k) Taxes

    These clever strategies will help you hold onto your money – so you'll have more available for your retirement.
  10. Professionals

    How Going Green Can Cut Your Taxes

    Investors looking to improve their bottom line via green investing without risk should take advantage of these tax credits.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  2. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  4. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  5. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  6. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!