Division Of Corporate Finance


DEFINITION of 'Division Of Corporate Finance'

The Division of Corporate Finance is a branch of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The division is responsible for ensuring that publicly-traded firms provide the required level of disclosure of material information to investors. The division reviews all required documents issued to investors, including 10-K forms, 10-Q forms, proxy materials and annual reports.

BREAKING DOWN 'Division Of Corporate Finance'

It is important that investors receive the full picture regarding a company's financial picture and business conditions. Without proper disclosure, it would be difficult or impossible for investors to judge the value of publicly-traded firms in order to make buy or sell decisions. Thus, the disclosures overseen by the Division of Corporate Finance are central to the efficient functioning of the financial markets.

  1. Division Of Investment Management

    The Division of Investment Management is a branch of the U.S. ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. 10-K

    A comprehensive summary report of a company's performance that ...
  4. Registered Investment Advisor - ...

    An advisor or firm engaged in the investment advisory business ...
  5. SEC Form 10-Q

    A comprehensive report of a company's performance that must be ...
  6. Securities Exchange Act Of 1934

    The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 was created to provide governance ...
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