Dow Jones Utility Average - DJUA

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DEFINITION of 'Dow Jones Utility Average - DJUA'

The Dow Jones Utility Average is a price-weighted average of 15 utility stocks traded in the United States. The DJUA was started back in 1929.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dow Jones Utility Average - DJUA'

The utility average tends to decline when investors expect rising interest rates. Utilities tend to borrow a lot of money and, consequently, are more sensitive to changes in interest rates.

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