Dollar Bull

DEFINITION of 'Dollar Bull'

An investor or speculator who is optimistic about the outlook for the U.S. dollar against other currencies. A dollar bull expects the U.S. dollar to rise in value compared most major currencies over time, and will take this factor into consideration when positioning investment portfolios.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dollar Bull'

Dollar bulls may generally hold the view that it is sheer folly to bet in the long term against the U.S. economy, and by extension the U.S. dollar. Dollar bulls might not specifically know which currency the dollar will outperform, or they may take a bullish position against a specific currency. For example, dollar bulls could believe that the greenback will increase in value as long as it remains the world's dominant reserve currency, since it is backed by the economy of the United States and its government. Or a dollar bull could bet that the U.S. dollar (USD) would specifically outperform the euro (EUR).

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