Dollar Bond Index-Linked Securities - Dollar BILS

DEFINITION of 'Dollar Bond Index-Linked Securities - Dollar BILS'

A zero-coupon floating rate debt instrument with an interest rate that is determined by the return performance of a specified index over a given time period. The interest rate for dollar BILS is determined at maturity, once the change in the value of the specified index is known.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dollar Bond Index-Linked Securities - Dollar BILS'

Dollar BILS are typically useful for companies engaging in asset-liability matching. For example, if a company has a large liability due in six months, the company could invest its cash into dollar BILS now, rather than simply letting the cash sit idle for that time. The effective interest rate the company will receive from holding the dollar BILS will be equal to the return of the specified index during that time period, allowing the company to participate in any gains/losses the index incurs during that time period, but also still guaranteeing that the company will be able to liquidate its position for cash on the date it needs the funds to pay its liability.

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