DEFINITION of 'Dollar Bond'

1. A U.S. denominated bond that trades outside of the United States. Along with the principal, any coupon payments from the bond are paid in U.S. funds.

2. A bond with a price that is quoted in dollars, rather than based on its yield to maturity.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dollar Bond'

1. Non-U.S. firms and governments will often issue bonds denominated in U.S. currency in a bid to attract U.S. investors and/or hedge currency risks. There is less currency risk on dollar bonds for U.S.-based investors looking to access international debt markets when compared to the purchase of non-U.S. denominated bonds.

2. For example, suppose that a 10-year bond has a current yield to maturity of 3.83% and a current price of $850. If this bond were quoted in terms of yield it would be quoted as 3.83% but if it were being quoted in dollar terms the bond would be quoted as $850.

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