Do Not Increase - DNI

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DEFINITION of 'Do Not Increase - DNI'

Instructions on a good-till-cancelled buy-limit or stop order that tell a broker not to increase the number of shares bought or sold in the event of a stock dividend or stock split.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Do Not Increase - DNI'

This is telling a broker not to increase the shares of your order when the number of shares you own increases.

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