Doorbuster

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DEFINITION of 'Doorbuster'

A marketing and sales strategy retailers use to get a high volume of customers into their stores. During a doorbuster sale, a particular item or a selection of items is given at a special discount price for a limited period. These sales usually occur during certain holidays.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Doorbuster'

The most common holiday door buster deals are during Thanksgiving and Christmas. A doorbuster is a strategy that serves a dual purpose. The goal of these special low price deals is to get customers into the store to buy specific items on sale and also to get them to come in and look around at what other items the store has to offer. The idea behind the "limited time" strategy is to get customers to rush into a particular store in order to take advantage of these deals, but also to dissuade them from going into a competitor's store.

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