Designated Order Turnaround - DOT (SuperDOT)

DEFINITION of 'Designated Order Turnaround - DOT (SuperDOT)'

An electronic system that increases order efficiency by routing orders for listed securities directly to a specialist on the trading floor, instead of through a broker.

Also known as "SuperDOT."

BREAKING DOWN 'Designated Order Turnaround - DOT (SuperDOT)'

The DOT system is used by the New York Stock Exchange for small order entries, limit orders, and basket and program trades.

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