Dotcom Bubble

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DEFINITION of 'Dotcom Bubble'

An rapid rise in equity markets fueled by investments in internet-based companies. During the dotcom bubble of the late 1990s, the value of equity markets grew exponentially, with the technology-dominated Nasdaq index rising from under 1,000 to 5,000 between 1995 and 2000.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dotcom Bubble'

The dotcom bubble grew out of a combination of the presence of speculative or fad-based investing, the abundance of venture capital funding for startups and the failure of dotcoms to turn a profit. Investors poured money into internet startups during the 1990s in the hope that those companies would one day become profitable, and many investors and venture capitalists abandoned a cautious approach for fear of not being able to cash in on the growing use of the internet.

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