Double Hedging

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Double Hedging'

Hedging a position by using futures and options, thereby doubling the size of the hedge. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) considers double hedging to be a situation where a trader holds a long futures position in a commodity in excess of the speculative position limit to offset a fixed price sale, even though the trader has ample supplies of the commodity to honor all sales commitments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Double Hedging'

Increasing the size of a hedge to a level that is greater than the exposure faced by a firm or individual may take it into the realm of speculation. For example, an investor with a stock portfolio of $1 million who wishes to hedge downside risk in the broad market can do so by buying put options of a similar amount on the S&P 500. Double hedging would occur if the investor also initiates an additional short position in the S&P 500 using index futures contracts.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Howard-D'Antonio Strategy

    An algorithm designed to maximize the expected return of a portfolio. ...
  2. Futures Market

    An auction market in which participants buy and sell commodity/future ...
  3. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  4. Hedge

    Making an investment to reduce the risk of adverse price movements ...
  5. Index Option

    A financial derivative that gives the holder the right, but not ...
  6. Futures Contract

    A contractual agreement, generally made on the trading floor ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Hedging Basics: What Is A Hedge?

    This strategy is widely misunderstood, but it's not as complicated as you may think.
  2. Active Trading

    How Companies Use Derivatives To Hedge Risk

    Derivatives can reduce the risks associated with changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices.
  3. Options & Futures

    A Beginner's Guide To Hedging

    Learn how investors use strategies to reduce the impact of negative events on investments.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States Gasoline Fund

    Learn about the United States Gasoline Fund, the characteristics of the exchange-traded fund, and the suitability and recommendations of it.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States 12 Month Oil

    Find out more information about the United States 12 Month Oil ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the characteristics, suitability and recommendations of it.
  6. Investing Basics

    What is the Theory of Backwardation?

    Backwardation occurs when the futures price of a commodity is lower than its market price today.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: U.S 12 Month Natural Gas

    Learn about the United States 12 Month Natural Gas Fund, an exchange-traded fund that invests in 12-month futures contracts for natural gas.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Floating Rate Bond

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the iShares Floating Rate Bond ETF, and learn how to use this ETF as a defense against rising interest rates.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: PowerShares DB Commodity Tracking

    Find out about the PowerShares DB Commodity Tracking ETF, and explore a detailed analysis of the fund that tracks 14 distinct commodities using futures contracts.
  10. Options & Futures

    Use Options to Hedge Against Iron Ore Downslide

    Using iron ore options is a way to take advantage of a current downslide in iron ore prices, whether for producers or traders.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between hedging and speculation?

    Hedging involves taking an offsetting position in a derivative in order to balance any gains and losses to the underlying ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I hedge my portfolio to protect from a decline in the food and beverage sector?

    The food and beverage sector exhibits greater volatility than the broader market and tends to suffer larger-than-average ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  2. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  3. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  4. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  5. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  6. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!