Double Dipping

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DEFINITION of 'Double Dipping'

For brokerage firms, when a broker puts commissioned products into a fee-based account. The broker makes money from both the client and the commission.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Double Dipping'

There is more than one meaning for the term depending on the context. For example, the practice of drawing two incomes from the government, usually by holding a government job and receiving a pension, is also referred to as double-dipping.

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