Dove

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DEFINITION of 'Dove'

An economic policy advisor who promotes monetary policies that involve the maintenance of low interest rates, believing that inflation and its negative effects will have a minimal impact on society. This term is derived from the docile and placid nature of the bird of the same name, and is the opposite of the term "hawk".

Statements that suggest that inflation will have a minimal impact are called "dovish".

BREAKING DOWN 'Dove'

Doves prefer low interest rates as a means of encouraging growth within the economy because this tends to increase demand for consumer borrowing and spur consumer spending. As a result, doves believe the negative effects of low interest rates are negligible in the larger scheme of things. However, if interest rates are kept low for an indefinite period of time, inflation could rise considerably.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is the employment figure important to a "dove"

    The employment figure is important to doves, because they are primarily concerned with the health of the labor market. Doves ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The goals of a dovish Federal Reserve head are to maintain low interest rates, stimulate the overall economy, decrease the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the opposite of a "dove"?

    A dove is an economic policy adviser who favors maintaining low interest rates in hopes of stimulating the economy, while ... Read Full Answer >>
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