Dove

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DEFINITION of 'Dove'

An economic policy advisor who promotes monetary policies that involve the maintenance of low interest rates, believing that inflation and its negative effects will have a minimal impact on society. This term is derived from the docile and placid nature of the bird of the same name, and is the opposite of the term "hawk".

Statements that suggest that inflation will have a minimal impact are called "dovish".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dove'

Doves prefer low interest rates as a means of encouraging growth within the economy because this tends to increase demand for consumer borrowing and spur consumer spending. As a result, doves believe the negative effects of low interest rates are negligible in the larger scheme of things. However, if interest rates are kept low for an indefinite period of time, inflation could rise considerably.

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