Dow Jones BRIC 50 Index

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DEFINITION of 'Dow Jones BRIC 50 Index'

A market capitalization-weighted stock index containing 50 of the most liquid and largest companies operating in Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC nations). The index uses the Dow Jones Global Indexes as its stock universe for the four nations, which cover approximately 95% of the market capitalization on local exchanges. Fifteen positions are targeted for each Brazil, Russia and China, while Russia's representation is targeted for five positions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dow Jones BRIC 50 Index'

Selection for the index is based on a ranking system that looks equally at free-float market capitalization and average daily volume. The top 10 ranked stocks in each sub-index are selected, along with a customized selection of five more between the rankings of 11 and 20 (these numbers are prorated for Russia).

The index is reconstituted annually and weightings are adjusted quarterly. No single stock can make up more than 10% of the BRIC 50 Index.

BRIC investing has become a trendy strategy, as these nations represent large, developing economies that are becoming more and more involved in the global economy. China representation is sought only in the offshore market, where H-shares and American Depositary receipts are available on different stock exchanges.

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