Down Payment

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DEFINITION

A type of payment made in cash during the onset of the purchase of an expensive good/service. The payment typically represents only a percentage of the full purchase price; in some cases it is not refundable if the deal falls through. Financing arrangements are made by the purchaser to cover the remaining amount owed to the seller.

Making a down payment and then paying the rest of the price through installments is a method that makes expensive assets more affordable for the typical person.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

For example, because houses are extremely expensive assets, home buyers typically pay down payments that equal 5-25% of the total value of a home. The remaining 75-95% of the price will be covered by a bank or other financial institutions through a mortgage loan.




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