Downsize

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DEFINITION of 'Downsize'

Reducing the size of a company by eliminating workers and/or divisions within the company.

It is sometimes referred to as "trimming the fat".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Downsize'

When a company downsizes, it is attempting to find ways to improve efficiency and increase profitability.

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