Loading the player...

What is the 'Dow Theory'

The Dow theory is an approach to trading developed by Charles H. Dow, who with Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser founded Dow Jones & Company Inc. and developed the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Dow fleshed the theory out in a series of editorials in the Wall Street Journal, which he co-founded, beginning in 1900 and ending with his death in 1902.

The theory has undergone further developments in its 100-plus year history, including contributions by William Hamilton in the 1920s, Robert Rhea in the 1930s, and E. George Shaefer and Richard Russell in the 1960s. Aspects of the theory have lost ground, for example its emphasis on the transportation sector – or railroads, in its original form – but Dow's approach still forms the core of modern technical analysis.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dow Theory'

There are six main components to the Dow theory. They are summarized briefly here; for a more in-depth look read Chad Langager and Casey Murphy's tutorial.

1. The market discounts everything. The Dow theory operates on the efficient markets hypothesis, which states that asset prices incorporate all available information. In other words, this approach is the antithesis of behavioral economics. Earnings potential, competitive advantage, management competence – all of these factors and more are priced into the market, even if not every individual knows all or any of these details. In more strict readings of this theory, even future events are discounted in the form of risk.

2. There are three kinds of market trends. Markets experience primary trends which last a year or more, such as a bull or bear market. Within these broader trends, they experience secondary trends, often working against the primary trend, such as a pullback within a bull market or a rally within a bear market; these secondary trends last from three weeks to three months. Finally, there minor trends lasting less than three weeks, which are largely noise.

3. Primary trends have three phases. A primary trend will pass through three phases, according to the Dow theory. In a bull market, these are the accumulation phase, the public participation (or big move) phase and the excess phase. In a bear market, they are called the distribution phase, the public participation phase and the panic (or despair) phase. 

4. Indices must confirm each other. In order for a trend to be established, Dow postulated that indices or market averages must confirm each other. Dow used the two indices he and his partners invented, the Dow Jones Industrial (DJIA) and Rail (now Transportation) Averages, on the assumption that if business conditions were in fact healthy – as a rise in the DJIA might suggest – the railroads would be profiting from moving the freight this business activity required. If asset prices were rising but the railroads were suffering, the trend would likely not be sustainable. The converse also applies: if railroads are profiting but the market is in a downturn, there is no clear trend.

5. Volume must confirm the trend. Volume should increase if price is moving in the direction of the primary trend, and decrease if it is moving against it. Low volume signals a weakness in the trend. For example, in a bull market, volume should increase as the price is rising, and fall during secondary pullbacks. If, in this example, volume picks up during a pullback, it could be a sign that the trend is reversing as more market participants turn bearish.

6. Trends persist until a clear reversal occurs. Reversals in primary trends can be confused with secondary trends. Determining whether an upswing in a bear market is a reversal – the beginning of a bull market – or a short-lived rally to be followed by lower lows is difficult, and the Dow theory advocates caution, insisting that reversal be confirmed.

 

RELATED TERMS
  1. Dow 30

    Commonly referred to as just the "Dow," the Dow 30 was created ...
  2. Dow Jones Industrial Average - ...

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted average ...
  3. Dow Jones Transportation Average ...

    A price-weighted average of 20 transportation stocks traded in ...
  4. Dow Jones 65 Composite Average

    A composite index that measures changes within the 65 companies ...
  5. Trending Market

    A market that is trending in one direction or another. A bull ...
  6. Dow Jones U.S. Market Index

    A market-capitalization-weighted index maintained by Dow Jones ...
Related Articles
  1. Insights

    Dow Theory

    Learn about the foundation upon which technical analysis is based.
  2. Investing

    Why The Dow Matters

    Although the DJIA only includes 30 stocks, it can tell you a lot about the market as a whole.
  3. Investing

    Giants of Finance: Charles Dow

    Find out how this financial visionary helped everyday people enter the world of finance.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is the Dow Jones Industrial Average used in the Dow theory?

    Discover how the Dow Jones Industrial Average is used in the Dow Theory, which is used by traders to figure out the trend ... Read Answer >>
  2. When was the Dow Jones Industrial Average first calculated?

    Charles Henry Dow was born on a farm in Connecticut on November 6, 1851. Farming didn't suit Charles Dow, however, so he ... Read Answer >>
  3. Who or what is Dow Jones?

    Dow Jones, or more precisely "Dow Jones & Company", is one of the largest business and financial news companies in the world. ... Read Answer >>
  4. Is the Dow Jones a public company?

    Find out how the Dow Jones Industrial Average tracks the health of the U.S. economy. This fluctuating number indicates the ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are these points that the Dow is always gaining or losing?

    The Dow is a list, or index, of companies considered to be good indicators of the market's strength. Simply put, these companies ... Read Answer >>
  6. Can you buy shares in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA)?

    Invest in the Dow Jones Industrial Average index through index funds or ETFs. Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. IRS Publication 970

    A document published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that provides information on tax benefits available to students ...
  2. Federal Direct Loan Program

    A program that provides low-interest loans to postsecondary students and their parents. The William D. Ford Federal Direct ...
  3. Cash Flow

    The net amount of cash and cash-equivalents moving into and out of a business. Positive cash flow indicates that a company's ...
  4. PLUS Loan

    A low-cost student loan offered to parents of students currently enrolled in post-secondary education. With a PLUS Loan, ...
  5. Graduate Record Examination - GRE

    A standardized exam used to measure one's aptitude for abstract thinking in the areas of analytical writing, mathematics ...
  6. Graduate Management Admission Test - GMAT

    A standardized test intended to measure a test taker's aptitude in mathematics and the English language. The GMAT is most ...
Trading Center