Drop Lock

DEFINITION of 'Drop Lock'

An arrangement whereby the interest rate on a floating rate note or preferred stock becomes fixed if it falls to a specified level.

BREAKING DOWN 'Drop Lock'

If a country had a floating exchange rate and a currency that suddenly dropped, the drop lock would fix the exchange rate once it hit a certain level.

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