DEFINITION of 'Dual Currency Bond'

A debt instrument in which the coupon and principal payments are made in two different currencies. The currency in which the bond is issued, which is called the base currency, will be the currency in which interest payments are made. The principal currency and amount are fixed when the bond is issued.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dual Currency Bond'

Dual currency bonds are subject to exchange rate risk. If the currency in which the principal will be repaid appreciates, the bondholder will make money; if it depreciates, he or she will lose money. Investors can use dual currency swaps, which have a fixed exchange rate at issuance, to offset the exchange risk of dual currency bonds.

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