Dual Pricing

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DEFINITION of 'Dual Pricing'

The practice of setting prices at different levels depending on the currency used to make the purchase. Dual pricing may be used to accomplish a variety of goals, such as to gain entry into a foreign market by offering unusually low prices to buyers using the foreign currency, or as a method of price discrimination.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dual Pricing'

Dual pricing can also take place in different markets that use the same currency. This is closer to price discrimination than when dual pricing is implemented in foreign markets and different currencies. Dual pricing is not necessarily an illegal pricing tactic; in fact, it is a legitimate pricing option in some industries. However, dual pricing, if done with the intent of dumping in a foreign market, can be considered illegal.

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