Dual Listing

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DEFINITION of 'Dual Listing'

When a company's securities are listed on more than one exchange for the purpose of adding liquidity to the shares and allowing investors greater choice in where they can trade their shares.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dual Listing'

Dual listing is not a widely used technique, although it is thought to improve the spread between the bid and ask prices, which helps investors obtain a better price for their securities. Hewlett-Packard (HP), for example, is listed on both the NYSE and Nasdaq.

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  4. Ask

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