Due From Account

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Due From Account'

An asset account in the general ledger that indicates the amount of deposits currently held at another company. The "due from" account is typically used in conjunction with a "due to" account to reconcile which accounts the money is due from and due to.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Due From Account'

The general ledger is the centralized source that contains all the financial accounts for a company. It contains debit and credit accounts, including the due from account, which is a debit account. The due to account is also sometimes referred to as intercompany receivables in the chart of accounts.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Correspondent

    The name given to a bank, broker, dealer, or financial institution ...
  2. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  3. Finance

    The science that describes the management, creation and study ...
  4. General Ledger

    A company's main accounting records. A general ledger is a complete ...
  5. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
  6. Accident Year Experience

    Premiums earned and losses incurred during a specific period ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can you use a cash flow statement to make a budget?

    To use the cash flow statement to make a budget, a company needs to combine the operating cash flow portion of its cash flow ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  2. Investing

    Off-Balance-Sheet Entities: An Introduction

    The theory and practice of these entities varies greatly. Investors need to learn what they're getting into.
  3. Markets

    Intangible Assets Provide Real Value To Stocks

    Intangible assets don't appear on balance sheets, but they're crucial to judging a company's value.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  7. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  8. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  10. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  2. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  3. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  4. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  5. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center