Durables

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Durables'

A category of consumer goods, durables are products that do not have to be purchased frequently. Some examples of durables are appliances, home and office furnishings, lawn and garden equipment, consumer electronics, toy makers, small tool manufacturers, sporting goods, photographic equipment, and jewelry.

Also known as "durable goods".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Durables'

Consumer goods are often classified as durables or non-durables. Durables are the stuff you buy to last, like a TV or a freezer.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Core Durable Goods Orders

    New orders for U.S. core durable goods, which are the total durable ...
  2. Durable Goods Orders

    An economic indicator released monthly by the Bureau of Census ...
  3. Rival Good

    A type of good that may only be possessed or consumed by a single ...
  4. Industry

    A classification that refers to a group of companies that are ...
  5. Cardboard Box Index

    An index used by some investors to gauge industrial production ...
  6. Warranty

    A type of guarantee that a manufacturer or similar party makes ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is the basket of goods selected for the Consumer Price Index?

    In the United States, the inflation level in the economy is approximated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics via a basket of ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What other sectors are most highly correlated with the automotive sector?

    The automotive sector is a broad category correlated with a variety of related industries. Auto parts manufacturers and raw ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you calculate the income effect distinctly from the price effect?

    Economists calculate the income effect separately from the price effect by keeping real income constant in the calculation. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What's the difference between the income effect and the substitution effect?

    The economics concepts of income effect and substitution effect express changes in the market and how these changes impact ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between the substitution effect and price effect?

    The substitution effect is caused solely by the change in price of a consumer item. The price effect relates directly to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What's the difference between economic value added (EVA) and producer surplus?

    The difference between economic value added (EVA) and producer surplus is that EVA measures the returns of a company above ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Is Your Stock Headed South?

    Don't let your portfolio go with it! Find out which signs to watch out for.
  2. Markets

    Consumer Spending As A Market Indicator

    What people buy and where they shop can provide valuable information about the economy.
  3. Budgeting

    Extended Warranties: Should You Take The Bait?

    Avoid shelling out for these policies and you could save hundreds of dollars.
  4. Options & Futures

    Three Documents You Shouldn't Do Without

    Estate planning is not just about the division of assets after you die. Read on to save your loved ones extra grief.
  5. Options & Futures

    Cyclical Versus Non-Cyclical Stocks

    Investing during an economic downturn simply means changing your focus. Discover the benefits of defensive stocks.
  6. Retirement

    Economic Indicators To Know

    The economy has a large impact on the market. Learn how to interpret the most important reports.
  7. Savings

    How to Invest in Liquor (and Avoiding the Hiccups)

    Investing in liquor has been profitable for ages but there could be some hiccups along the way.
  8. Economics

    What are Consumer Goods?

    Products that are purchased for consumption by the average consumer. Clothing, food, automobiles and jewelry are all examples of consumer goods
  9. Economics

    What are Consumer Packaged Goods?

    Consumer packaged goods, CPGs, are items that consumers use and purchase often.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    This ETF Can Weather Any Market Condition

    Looking for a winning ETF that's capable of performing in almost any environment?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center