Dutch Disease

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Dutch Disease'

Negative consequences arising from large increases in a country's income. Dutch disease is primarily associated with a natural resource discovery, but it can result from any large increase in foreign currency, including foreign direct investment, foreign aid or a substantial increase in natural resource prices.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dutch Disease'

Dutch disease has two main effects:

1. A decrease in the price competitiveness, and thus the export, of the affected country's manufactured goods
2. An increase in imports

In the long run, both these factors can contribute to manufacturing jobs being moved to lower-cost countries. The end result is that non-resource industries are hurt by the increase in wealth generated by the resource-based industries.


The term "Dutch disease" originates from a crisis in the Netherlands in the 1960s that resulted from discoveries of vast natural gas deposits in the North Sea. The newfound wealth caused the Dutch guilder to rise, making exports of all non-oil products less competitive on the world market.

In the 1970s, the same economic condition occurred in Great Britain, when the price of oil quadrupled and it became economically viable to drill for North Sea Oil off the coast of Scotland. By the late 1970s, Britain had become a net exporter of oil; it had previously been a net importer. The pound soared in value, but the country fell into recession when British workers demanded higher wages and exports became uncompetitive.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Inflation

    The rate at which the general level of prices for goods and services ...
  2. Resource Curse

    A paradoxical situation in which countries with an abundance ...
  3. Value Added

    The enhancement a company gives its product or service before ...
  4. Export

    A function of international trade whereby goods produced in one ...
  5. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate ...
  6. Import

    A good or service brought into one country from another. Along ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Economics Basics

    Learn economics principles such as the relationship of supply and demand, elasticity, utility, and more!
  2. Economics

    What Is The Balance Of Payments?

    The balance of payments helps countries to track how much money is coming in and how much money is going out. Learn more about BOPs here.
  3. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  4. Budgeting

    Current Account Deficits: Government Investment Or Irresponsibility?

    Deficit can be a sign of trouble for some countries, and of health for others. Find out what it means when more funds are exiting than entering a nation.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Global Telecom

    Learn about the iShares Global Telecom exchange-traded fund, which invests in U.S. and foreign telecommunication companies with high dividend yields.
  6. Economics

    Is a Recession Coming?

    In the space of a week, the VIX Index, a measure of market volatility, spiked from 13, suggesting extreme complacency, to over 50, evidencing total panic.
  7. Active Trading Fundamentals

    The Top 5 Impact Investing Firms

    Learn what impact investing is and obtain information on some of the top impact investing firms ranked by total assets under management.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares MSCI Hong Kong

    Learn about the iShares MSCI Hong Kong fund, which invests in various equities of companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 Switzerland ETFs

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the top three Swiss exchange-traded funds that offer exposure to the Swiss equities market.
  10. Forex

    The Pros and Cons of a Fully Convertible Rupee

    Amid the rising economic power of India, the talks of making the Indian currency fully convertible are gaining momentum. We look at the pros and cons.
RELATED FAQS
  1. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the ethical arguments against government subsidies to companies like Tesla?

    The ethical argument behind government subsidies is that they should be put into place to help industries that will, in turn, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can tariffs cause inefficiencies in domestic industries?

    Any government regulation naturally creates inefficiencies in a pure supply and demand marketplace. When it comes to the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does the risk of investing in the industrial sector compare to the broader market?

    There is increased risk when investing in the industrial sector compared to the broader market due to high debt loads and ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do changes in interest rates affect the spending habits in the economy?

    Changes in interest rates can have different effects on consumer spending habits depending on a number of factors, including ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  2. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  3. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  4. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  5. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  6. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!