Dynamic Momentum Index

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DEFINITION of 'Dynamic Momentum Index'

An indicator used in technical analysis that determines overbought and oversold conditions of a particular asset. This indicator is very similar to the relative strength index (RSI). The main difference between the two is that the RSI uses a fixed number of time periods (usually 14), while the dynamic momentum index uses different time periods as volatility changes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dynamic Momentum Index'

This indicator is interpreted in the same manner as the RSI where readings below 30 are deemed to be oversold and levels over 70 are deemed to be overbought. The number of time periods used in the dynamic momentum index decreases as volatility in the underlying asset increases, making this indicator more responsive to changing prices than the RSI.

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