Dynasty Trust

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DEFINITION of 'Dynasty Trust '

Long-term trusts created to pass wealth from generation to generation without incurring transfer taxes such as estate and gift tax. The dynasty trust's defining characteristic is its term. The trust can survive for 21 years after the death of the last beneficiary who was alive when the trust was set up, and it can theoretically last for more than 100 years. The beneficiaries of a dynasty trust are usually the grantor's children, and after the death of the last child, the grantor's grandchildren or great-grandchildren generally become the beneficiaries. The trust's operation is controlled by the trustee who is appointed by the grantor. The dynasty trust is irrevocable, which means that once it is funded, the grantor will not have any control over the assets or be permitted to amend the trust terms.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dynasty Trust '

In order to stem the loss of billions of dollars in estate taxes, Congress enacted the generation-skipping transfer tax (GSTT) in 1986. While the GSTT is applicable to dynasty trusts, every individual (as of 2012) has a GSTT exemption of $5.12 million, or $10.24 million in case of a married couple.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can I put my IRA in a trust?

    You cannot put your IRA in a trust while you are living. You can, however, name a trust as the beneficiary of your IRA and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the trust maker transfer funds into a revocable trust?

    Once a revocable trust is created, a trust maker transfers funds or property into the trust by including them in a list with ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a revocable trust and a living trust?

    A revocable trust and living trust are separate terms that describe the same thing: a trust in which the terms can be changed ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How exactly does one go about revoking a revocable trust?

    The basic steps involved in revoking a revocable trust are fairly simple, and include transfer of assets and an official ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust?

    An irrevocable trust and a revocable trust are differentiated through the ability to change the trust. With an irrevocable ... Read Full Answer >>
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    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>

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