E-Meeting

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DEFINITION of 'E-Meeting'

A meeting that takes place over an electronic medium rather than in the traditional face-to-face fashion. The most common form of an e-meeting is done through web-based software which allows individuals and groups from around the globe to facilitate meetings without physically travelling to an agreed upon location.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'E-Meeting'

The most important aspect to the majority of web-based e-meeting software is Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP. VoIP allows voice transmission over the internet, which is the key to facilitating a real-time e-meeting. Some software also allows participants to create graphs and charts in real-time, as well as record and save the entire meeting so it can be reviewed at a later date.

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