Earnings Power Value - EPV

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DEFINITION of 'Earnings Power Value - EPV'

A technique for valuing stocks by making an assumption about the sustainability of current earnings and the cost of capital but assuming no further growth. Earnings power value (EPV) is a specific formula: Adjusted Earnings / Cost of Capital. While the formula is simple, finding the adjusted earnings can be difficult and must consider operating earnings, taxation adjustments, depreciation and more.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Earnings Power Value - EPV'

EPV was developed by Columbia University Professor Bruce Greenwald. One of the ways that it helps investors evaluate the intrinsic value of a position is by removing the difficulties of other evaluation formulas. However, that can mean that EPV is less accurate than other, more thorough methods. EPV does give a clear look at a company's present situation though.

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