Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Amortization And Exceptional Items - EBITAE

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DEFINITION of 'Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Amortization And Exceptional Items - EBITAE'

An accounting metric often used to deduct the amortization of intangible assets to arrive at a value. Companies will use EBITAE not only as a measure of performance, but also to determine interest coverage capabilities. The eliminated items are often seen as factors that distort earnings that are derived from the underlying business operations of a firm.

Calculated as:

Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Amortization And Exceptional Items (EBITAE)

Where expenses* represents expenses that exclude interest, taxes, amortization of intangible assets and exceptional items.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Amortization And Exceptional Items - EBITAE'

When evaluating EBITAE, investors will look at the figure as a percentage of revenue and they will also measure EBITAE margin. Both the percentage and margin will be compared to previous years' figures to evaluate performance. This ratio is very similar to the EBITDA, a very popular performance measure often used by investors.

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