EBITDA to sales ratio

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'EBITDA to sales ratio'


A financial metric used to assess a company's profitability by comparing its revenue with earnings. More specifically, since EBITDA is derived from revenue, this metric would indicate the percentage of a company is remaining after operating expenses.

Sometimes referred to as "EBITDA margin".

Calculated as:


EBITDA to sales ratio
Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'EBITDA to sales ratio'


For example, if XYZ Corp's EBITDA is $1 billion and its revenue is $10 billion, then its EBITDA to sales ratio is 10%. Generally, a higher value is appreciated for this ratio as that would indicate that the company is able to keep its earnings at a good level via efficient processes that have kept certain expenses low.

However, when comparing company's EBITDA margin, make sure that the companies are in related industries as different size companies in different industries are bound to have different cost structures, which could make comparisons irrelevant.

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