Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization, and Restructuring or Rent Costs - EBITDAR

What is 'Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization, and Restructuring or Rent Costs - EBITDAR'

Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, and restructuring or rent costs (EBITDAR) is a non-GAAP indicator of a company's financial performance calculated as:

= Revenue - Expenses (excluding tax, interest, depreciation, amortization and restructuring or rent costs)

Depending on the company and the goal of the user, the indicator can either include restructuring costs or rent costs, but usually not both. The EBITDAR indicator expands on EBITDA by adding an additional excluded item to give a better indication of financial performance.

BREAKING DOWN 'Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization, and Restructuring or Rent Costs - EBITDAR'

Rent is included in the measure when evaluating the financial performance of companies, such as casinos or restaurants, that have significant rental and lease expenses derived from business operations. By excluding these expenses, it is easier to compare one company to another and get a clearer picture of their operational performance.

Restructuring is included in the measure when a company has gone through a restructuring plan and has incurred costs from the plan. These costs, which are included on the income statement, are usually seen as nonrecurring and are excluded to give a better idea of the company's ongoing operations.

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